homepage nameheaderspecific bottom header

 

ART GALLERY CELEBRATES LOCAL TALENT AND HISTORY, by Amy Cavalier, MPNnow.com, 4/13/13 – A sculptor and professor at Monroe Community College, Susan Ferrari Rowley has no problems finding venues for her work in big cities like New York City. Rochester is a different story. "This is where I live and work and teach sculpture," said the Scottsville resident. "I don’t need a gallery, just a place to show the work to the city I live in."[more]

NEW ROCHESTER GALLERY OFFERS SOMETHING UNUSUAL; AN EXHIBIT BY A FEMALE SCULPTOR, by Stacy Gittleman, Democrat and Chronicle, 11/11/2012 -- In the male-dominated world of art, it's tough to be a woman sculptor. Women artists seldom get the space they deserve in the pages of an Art History 101 textbook. The exclusion of works by women is further evidenced in the inventory of American museums, where only about 5 percent of museum collections include works by women artists, according to the Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, D.C. An even smaller percentage include sculptures by women.[more]  PAGE 1  •  PAGE 2  •  PAGE 3

FOREST HILLS CEMETERY: OPEN AIR MUSEUM BOASTS A SCULPTURAL PATH, by Sam Baltrusis, HelloBoston.com, posted 7/24/10 -- While King’s Chapel and Granary burial grounds get all of the attention among tourists looking to hobnob with the ghosts of Boston’s colonial past, Forest Hills Cemetery in Jamaica Plain is a sublime historic garden cemetery boasting 275-acres of winding paths, rugged hills and memorial statues celebrating the lives of Boston-area civic leaders, inventors, artists and blue-collar men and women who left an indelible legacy at this landmark dating back to 1848.[more]

FUNCTION AND BEAUTY; AN ARTIST CASTS HER VISION USING INTEGRALLY COLORED PRECAST CONCRETE. (Western Gateway Project/Susan Ferrari Rowley design), Sarah Fister, The Concrete Producer, 1/1/04 – Driving down the highway, most commuters put little thought into their daily trek. Who would, with looming sound barriers that are tall, bland and unappealing? Engineers, as well as the public, believe concrete needs to be boring.[more]

DANCE REVIEW; PLASTIC BODIES THAT DEFY EXTREMES, by Anna Kisselgoff, The New York Times, 11/4/2000 -- The images are mysterious. Susan Ferrari Rowley’s jagged sculpture, strikingly lighted by C.T. Oakes, is suspended over four ghostly figures in stocking masks: Chris Morrison, Bill Ferguson, Steve Humphrey and Natalie Rogers. [more]

NEW DIRECTIONS, Rochester Business Journal; Time Out, 10/6/12, Susan Ferrari Rowley will be showing new artworks during an exhibition opening Oct. 5 at the Axom Gallery. The show represents a broadening of Rowley’s focus.[more]

PUBLIC ARTS COMPETITION, The New York State Department of Transportation, 5/1/07 – The winner of the noise barrier focus panel competition was Susan Ferrari-Rowley from Churchville. Ms. Ferrari-Rowley’s design is an abstract composed of formed concrete, which will incorporate molded glass chunks and bent stainless steel rods panted in blues and greens. The design is suggestive of movement and water to remind us of why this city began and the section in which we are headed.[more]

IN BRIEF: MCC’S SUSAN FERRARI-ROWLEY RECEIVES SUNY CHANCELLOR’S AWARD, Metropolitan; A Publication of the Arts & Cultural Council for Greater Rochester, Summer 2011 – Susan Ferrrari-Rowley, Assistant Professor of Fine Art at Monroe Community College (MCC), has been selected tor receive the 2011 SUNY Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Scholarship and Creative Activities. This prestigious award is reserved for faculty who have consistently demonstrated superlative performance within and beyond their position.[more]

NEW DIRECTIONS: A SOLO EXHIBITION OF SCULPTURE; Rochester Almanac, 11/12 Works by Susan Ferrari Rowley, assistant professor of fine art at Monroe Community College, Rowley, who has been exhibiting nationally and internationally since 1984, features her “residential scale” sculpture for the first time, plus a new product line of wearable sculpture.[more]

TMI ARTS PAGE: SUSAN FERRARI ROWLEY AT THE WHITE GALLERY, by Carola Lott, The Millbrook Independent, 10/24/12 – “Simple Lines” an exhibition of Susan Ferrari Rowley’s work at The White Gallery in Lakeville is both serene and highly dramatic. Although each piece is made of white translucent polyfiber hand stitched onto brushed aluminum frames, the works are all quite different.[more]

THE VISUAL ARTWORKER: A DIALOG ABOUT CONTEMPORARY ART IN WESTERN NEW YORK, Axom Gallery press release, 11/17/12 – Over to the Axom Gallery on another night for an artist talk by Susan Ferrari-Rowley. Susan carried on an animated discussion about her minamalist constructions and answered audience questions.[more]

ART & CULTURE: WHITE GALLERY OPENS FALL SEASON, Litchfield County Times, 10/4/12 – “Simple Lines” opens the fall season at Lakeville’s White Gallery on October 12 and will feature the work of award-winning sculptor Susan Ferrrari-Rowley.[more]

ROCHESTER PUBLIC ART: AN INVENTORY OF ROCHESTER NY’S LANDMARK SCULPTURE, MONUMENTS, AND MEMORIALS. rochesterpublicart.com, 1995 – A kite-like handing fabric sculpture. Characterized by a linear quality that defines and implies the organization of space, my sculptures are clean and minimal, creating complex emotional tension through the placement and absence of elements.[more]

THE ART SCENE: LEAVING IN, ALSO LEAVING OUT, by Leon Graham, The Lakeville Journal, 10/18/12 – Susan Ferrari Rowley’s sculpture is about opposites and paradoxes; yielding and unyielding materials, volume and its absence, light and shadow. Pieces seem almost weightless, fragile; yet they occupy large spaces. They are difficult at first, peculiar, almost too simple. But quickly you discover their complexity. What is absent is as important as what is there in Rowley’s glowing pieces.[more]